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It’s Not Too Late to Craft Your 2019 Financial Game Plan

Financial New Year’s resolutions are one of the most common as nearly one-third of Americans plan to make one in 2019 according to a Fidelity survey. While wishing to strengthen your financial situation in the new year is a good first step, actually following through on this can be difficult. Everyone’s situation is unique, but let’s take a look at a few of the top areas to address when crafting your 2019 financial game plan.

Reevaluate your savings strategy
The start of the new year is a great time to take a step back and reevaluate your current savings strategy. First, consider looking into your retirement savings options. If you have not already, maximize the match your employer offers for 401(k) contributions. One in five workers are not contributing enough to get the full match from their employer according to research from benefits administrator Alight Solutions. 

Additionally, consider sitting down with your GuideStream financial advisor if your goals or needs have changed recently. Perhaps you have a new child on the way and want to begin an education savings plan, or maybe you have set a resolution to make a big purchase in the new year. Whatever your new goal may be, being prepared for the financial commitment ahead of time will be a big help in achieving it.

Learn and build your credit score
Your credit score is a constantly evolving number that banks and other lenders use to decide whether to approve you for a loan or line of credit. If you do not know your current score, it can be easily checked for free on a number of sites such as annualcreditreport.com or creditkarma.com. Checking your score on these sites does not hurt your score since it is a soft inquiry. A hard inquiry, on the other hand, is done by banks or lenders when you apply for a new loan or credit card. Too many hard inquiries in a short period of time can have a negative impact on your score.

Once you know your current score, there are many different actions you can take to improve it. The most impactful however is to improve your credit utilization ratio, which is the amount of credit you are currently using comparative to your available line of credit. For example, if you have a $1,000 line of credit and just made a $900 credit card purchase, this will likely have a negative impact on your score the longer it remains at this high ratio. Paying off current credit amounts not only helps reduce this ratio but can help you save money lost on accumulating interest charges. Consider consulting your advisor on additional tips to improve your score and pay back debt.

Identify areas to cut back
Perhaps the simplest financial goal you can make for the new year is to reduce spending on non-essential purchases. One of the most popular ways Americans are cutting monthly costs is by getting rid of traditional cable. Though streaming services like Netflix and Hulu are far from brand new offerings, the content they offer is eliminating the need for many consumers to continue spending on cable TV. This results in cord-cutters saving an average of $85 per month even including the amounts spent on internet and streaming services according to Fortune.

In 2019, do not underestimate the savings that can be had in other purchase areas like restaurants and entertainment. Forbes contributor Priceonomics found that it is almost five times more expensive to order delivery from a restaurant than to cook at home. Of course, completely ditching all restaurant and entertainment expenses is not a realistic goal, but saving money on these occasions is still possible. Before planning a night out or heading to a restaurant, scan coupons sites such as Groupon and RetailMeNot for deals.

Biggest Retirement Savings Mistakes

According to Northwestern Mutual’s 2018 Planning & Progress Study, a shocking 21 percent of Americans have nothing at all saved for the future, and 78 percent say they are extremely or somewhat concerned about not having enough set aside for retirement.

Everyone’s path to retirement is different, but there are general rules that can help guide your savings strategy over time. Here are retirement tips for each stage of your life:

Your 20s: Not taking the advantage of time
Fresh into your new job out of college in your 20s is an exciting time and can set the foundation for a successful financial future. The biggest mistake to avoid during this time is not getting started early and missing out on the most powerful retirement savings factor out there: time.

Recency bias can push young savers to dedicate more than is required to student loans lessening the ability to compound savings. It may be natural to think of retirement as a lower priority since it is decades away compared to student loans, both can be done at the same time. 

Be sure to understand how your employer’s match works and maximize this if possible. Even if you have doubts about your current job in the long-term, most retirement savings can be transferred to your next employer or an individual retirement account should you choose to switch jobs.

Your 30s: Getting housed in
Life changing events such as marriage and children will likely start coming into play during this time. As these events occur, some savers may find themselves buying a house too early. 

While you should not feel pressure to stay cramped-up in a small apartment, be sure look at your first home purchase from all angles. Buying a home too small for your growing family might not work for your needs years down the road. Spending lavishly on a big home might seem sensible now, but consider what happens in the event of a move or job transition.

Your 40s: Shifting your focus
Your early years are considered the accumulation phase but do not think that your 40s are a time to neglect retirement contributions. By this time, there are may be many different areas that need financial attention in your life. How much should you be setting aside for your child’s education? Should you use that new bonus for a home remodel?

Questions during this time can get complex and it is important to prioritize what saving areas need the most attention. Now is a good time to consult with your GuideStream financial advisor to break down these various areas and your goals for each.

Your 50s: Inaccurate assumptions
By your 50s, you likely have a clearer picture of what your savings situation looks like and can begin preparing for when you want to retire and the expenses you expect to have.

Too often, savers underestimate what they will need throughout retirement. According to a recent study featured in Wealth Professional, 15 percent of retirees globally do not have enough income to live comfortably and another 43 percent say they could have used a little more income after retiring.

Similar to your 40s, these decisions of when to retire and how much will be needed can be complex to navigate. With the help of your GuideStream financial advisor, consider all of the factors that may be in play. These can include upcoming healthcare costs, what happens in the case of an underperforming market, and other scenarios.

Retirement Planning for Small Businesses

By our own Caitllin Koppelman
for Jackson Magazine

Planning for retirement as a small business owner is important for you and your employees. Small businesses have unique needs. Thankfully, you have various options when it comes to retirement plans and a little bit of exploration can help you find a solution that best fits the needs of you and your employees. 

Some of your retirement plan options include:  

  • SEP IRAs
  • SIMPLE IRAs
  • Traditional or Safe Harbor 401(k)s
  • Profit-sharing plans

Simplified Employee Pension (SEP) IRA is funded by employer contributions. Benefits for all employees must be uniform (ie: the same percentage of compensation). Contributions are limited to the lesser of either 25% of the employee’s compensation or $55,000 per year. SEP IRAs allow you a relatively low-maintenance way to contribute to your employees’ retirement, and contributions are deductible by the employer for income tax purposes. 

Savings Incentive Match Plan for Employees (SIMPLE) IRA allows for both employer and employee contributions. Employee contributions are limited to $12,500 per year, and employers have to either match up to 3% of employee contributions or contribute 2% of the employee’s salary. 

Like a SIMPLE IRA, 401(k) Plans allow employees to save money in a tax-deferred account for retirement. Traditional 401k plans hold “pre-tax” money, so the money will be taxed when it’s withdrawn from the account for retirement expenses. 401k plans can be set up to allow Roth (or “after-tax”) contributions as well. Employees can contribute a regular amount into the account, straight out of their paycheck. 401k contribution limits are significantly higher than Traditional IRA limits. An employee could defer $18,500 for 2018, plus an additional $6000 if he/she is age 50 or over. Employers can choose to match funds contributed by employees. Keep in mind that 401k plans require a bit more administrative work and legal documentation. A Safe Harbor 401k plan mandates employer contributions. 

Profit-sharing Plan gives employees a portion of company profits. Employers have a great deal of latitude when it comes to contributions: employers can give as much as they want (up to the annual contribution limit, which is the lesser of $55,000 per year or 100% of the employee’s compensation) or none at all, depending on the year’s profits. Contributions do have to be distributed proportionately to the employees. The administration of a profit-sharing plan can be burdensome for some employers, depending on the number of participants in the plan. 

There are two major things to consider when selecting a plan: contributions and administration. If you’re considering starting a plan for yourself and your employees, you should discuss your options in detail with your GuideStream financial advisor and your CPA.  

 

*information adapted from an article written by Advicent Solutions, an entity unrelated to GuideStream Financial. 

Planning Your Estate

by Scott Blakemore
for Jackson Magazine

What is your dream sportscar? Corvette, Mustang, Porsche, Ferrari, Lamborghini, Bugatti, McLaren? Now, imagine you own it and decide to give it to your son or daughter … but they don’t know how to drive … because you never taught them. You just hand them the keys and say, “Good Luck!”  

I think we can agree this strategy is a little crazy and unwise.  However, when you and your spouse are deceased, and your heirs inherit your estate without understanding how it was managed and for what purpose – it is the equivalent of handing a sportscar to an untrained driver.    

I speak with clients daily about retirement cash flows, portfolio allocations, distribution timing, and taxes.  And while those things need to be understood and managed for a successful retirement, planning for the transition of an estate is equally crucial – especially if you’re concerned your heirs may not be ready to manage it or worse, you fear it might destroy them.

I know talking about death can be uncomfortable, and kids rarely want to discuss a future where their parents are gone.  But that day will come whether we like it or not. Talking about death with your children is like talking about sex – always a bit awkward, but the earlier the better.

So how do you prepare to talk to your children about your estate?  Here are several simple ideas to get the conversation started and a few that dig a little deeper.

First, the easier items to implement:

  • Talk about your funeral.  Write down your wishes and share them with your family.
  • Keep your bank, investment account(s) and insurance beneficiaries up to date.
  • Introduce your family to your Financial Advisor, CPA and/or Attorney.
  • Use Estate planning tools.  Let the family know if you have a Will or Trust as well as Durable and Health Care Power of Attorney (POA) documents.  Make sure your designated representative is willing to serve, understands your wishes, and knows where your documents are located.

Second, the more involved items to consider:

  • Have an annual family meeting to discuss any changes you have made to your financial or estate plan.  Be sure to allow time for questions.
  • Bring heirs into the conversation with organizations where you volunteer or provide financial support.
  • Create a family foundation or donor advised fund to give together during your lifetime. This is a great teaching tool.  

These items will obviously require some work.  However, with your heirs being part of the discussion, and doing the work alongside you, you can be confident they not only hear and see your values but participate in them as well.  They will experience the legacy you are trying to create while learning valuable lessons about managing the resources that will one day be under their stewardship.  

Remember, learning to drive isn’t accomplished through watching a YouTube video, and neither should learning how to manage an inheritance. I encourage you to work through the fear and discomfort and invite your children into the conversation to create a legacy impacting them and our world for good.  

 

 

Retirement Planning for Small Businesses

Planning for retirement as a small business owner is important for you and your employees. Small businesses have unique needs. Thankfully, you have various options when it comes to retirement plans and a little bit of exploration can help you find a solution that best fits the needs of you and your employees. 

Some of your retirement plan options include:  

  • SEP IRAs
  • SIMPLE IRAs
  • Traditional or Safe Harbor 401(k)s
  • Profit-sharing plans

Simplified Employee Pension (SEP) IRAis funded by employer contributions. Benefits for all employees must be uniform (ie: the same percentage of compensation). Contributions are limited to the lesser of either 25% of the employee’s compensation or $55,000 per year. SEP IRAs allow you a relatively low-maintenance way to contribute to your employees’ retirement, and contributions are deductible by the employer for income tax purposes. 

Savings Incentive Match Plan for Employees (SIMPLE) IRA allows for both employer and employee contributions. Employee contributions are limited to $12,500 per year, and employers have to either match up to 3% of employee contributions or contribute 2% of the employee’s salary. 

Like a SIMPLE IRA, a401(k) Plansallow employees to save money in a tax-deferred account for retirement. Traditional 401k plans hold “pre-tax” money, so the money will be taxed when it’s withdrawn from the account for retirement expenses. 401k plans can be set up to allow Roth (or “after-tax”) contributions as well. Employees can contribute a regular amount into the account, straight out of their paycheck. 401k contribution limits are significantly higher than Traditional IRA limits. An employee could defer $18,500 for 2018, plus an additional $6000 if he/she is age 50 or over. Employers can choose to match funds contributed by employees. Keep in mind that 401k plans require a bit more administrative work and legal documentation. A Safe Harbor 401k plan mandates employer contributions. 

Profit-sharing Plangives employees a portion of company profits. Employers have a great deal of latitude when it comes to contributions: employers can give as much as they want (up to the annual contribution limit, which is the lesser of $55,000 per year or 100% of the employee’s compensation) or none at all, depending on the year’s profits. Contributions do have to be distributed proportionately to the employees. The administration of a profit-sharing plan can be burdensome for some employers, depending on the number of participants in the plan. 

There are two major things to consider when selecting a plan: contributions and administration. If you’re considering starting a plan for yourself and your employees, you should discuss your options in detail with your financial advisor and your CPA.  

 

*information adapted from an article written by Advicent Solutions, an entity unrelated to GuideStream Financial. 

Life Insurance: Term, Whole & Universal

Buying life insurance is a way for an individual to protect their dependents from unpaid liabilities and uncovered expenses in the event of their own death. The benefits of a life insurance policy can be unclear and may lead to challenges when trying to determine which policy is the best for different situations. In this article, we will examine each of the types of life insurance, what they cover, and when individuals typically use them.

Term vs. Permanent
All life insurance falls under one of two categories: term and permanent. Term life insurance only covers a pre-set amount of time, whereas permanent life insurance can cover the duration of the insured’s life. 

Term Life Insurance
Term life insurance is a policy that lasts for a relatively short period of time—usually 10-20 years—and comes with a death benefit.  Once the term ends, policies can typically be renewed, though usually at a higher cost (because the policyholder is older and inherently comes with higher health risks). Applicants usually need to pass a medical examination to qualify for term life insurance.

Term life insurance is typically the most affordable type of life insurance because it has a limited duration and no cash value that can be accessed. If the policyholder dies within the term, then beneficiaries will get a payment that they can use to cover lost income or to protect themselves from liabilities, such as a mortgage or outstanding personal debt. While this makes term life policies an efficient way to mitigate the biggest financial problems caused by early death, their temporary nature prevents them from being used in most long-term estate plans. 

Whole Life Insurance
Whole life insurance is a type of permanent life insurance that guarantees a death benefit for the duration of the policyholder’s lifetime, provided that all premium payments are made. Due to the lifelong coverage period, this policy is better equipped for estate planning and charitable giving strategies than term life insurance. While most whole life policies feature fixed premiums that will not increase over time, their premiums are much higher than those for term life. This is because whole life insurance both provides a death benefit and accumulates a useable cash value. 

A whole life policy’s cash value can be used to produce dividends for its policyholder (typically at a predetermined rate) or can be borrowed against if the policyholder is in financial need. It is important to note that insurers put restrictions on borrowing against a policy and that any withdrawals will decrease the policy’s cash value.

Universal Life Insurance
Universal life insurance is another type of permanent life insurance that typically acts as a more flexible version of whole life. You are able to choose the length of guaranteed protection and the schedule for premium payments in advance. Both are guaranteed to remain unchanged (unless you choose to change them) so long as the premiums are paid on time and in full. As with whole life insurance, universal life provides both coverage and a cash value, so its premiums will tend to be higher than those for term life. However, universal life insurance policies typically offer more control over their cash value than whole life policies. Universal life insurance policyholders can increase their premiums to boost the policy’s cash value or can use their accumulated value to cover premium payments. To qualify for most universal life insurance plans, individuals must pass a medical exam. 

Variable Life Insurance
Variable life insurance, which is a variation of either whole or universal life insurance, permanently offers a death benefit to a beneficiary in the event of the policyholder’s death. However, variable life insurance offers the ability to change premiums to adjust the amount of coverage. Like other forms of permanent life insurance, variable universal life insurance takes a portion of the premiums and invests them in a tax-deferred account. The investments are allocated in mutual-fund-type accounts and are therefore subject to market volatility, which will likely affect the total cash value of the account.

Insurance can be an important part of a comprehensive financial plan. However, different individuals have varying needs, and no single policy will be most appropriate for everyone. Ask your trusted advisor at GuideStream Financial how a life insurance policy can best be integrated into your financial planning.  

What to Expect With Probate

Probate is the legal process of distributing a deceased person’s estate according to their last will and testament and paying off any debt owed to their creditors. This process typically lasts four to six months but depends largely on the complexity of the will and size of the estate.

Preliminary
In order to begin the process, there must be an individual named as the executor of the will. In many cases, the decedent’s will explicitly appoints an executor. An application must then be submitted with the will and the death certificate in the county in which the decedent lived during the time of death. In some cases, such as an unexpected death, there may be no executor named in the will or no will at all. This would require a court-supervised probate process to appoint one.

Prove validity of the will
Once an executor has been named, they must supply the courts with evidence that the will is valid. In most states, this requires two witnesses, which the law prefers to not be heirs under the will. This ensures the will was made in proper capacity and was done freely. 

Initial hearing 
An initial hearing is a formality to begin the legal process and usually doesn’t require attendance. Formal legal notice must be sent to all beneficiaries named in the will prior to the hearing. This step can lengthen if beneficiaries dispute the executor’s appointment or others included in the will.

Alert creditors
In order to move forward with the distribution of assets to beneficiaries, all debts and liabilities due on the estate must first be paid. This involves alerting all creditors of the decedent’s passing and posting a death notice in the local newspaper for any unknown creditors.

Posting bond
In some cases, executors may be required to post a bond before handling an estate. This is because an executor is considered a fiduciary of the estate and the bond helps prevent fraud or mismanagement of assets. The bail amount will vary depending on the size of the estate and will be returned once the estate is closed without issues.

Evaluating the estate
While the probate is being processed by the courts, a bank account should be opened in the name of the estate. Assets should be gathered and funneled into this bank account so they can be used to pay off any liabilities to creditors. A list of these assets must be provided to the court, which may need to be appraised to determine the value of the estate. Court approval may be needed before selling assets to pay off liabilities.

Distributing assets 
The process of distributing assets to beneficiaries can vary from case to case and may be subject to court approval. Due to potential time constraints, such as money for students currently enrolled in college, the process may need to be expedited.

Dividing assets
For hard assets that can’t be evenly distributed, such as homes and cars, a meeting with family members will determine how the asset with be handled. This commonly results in selling the asset and evenly distributing the proceeds. If an individual wants to take ownership of a hard asset, they must facilitate how to fairly compensate others.

Cost & Timing of Home Remodeling

As with many large purchases, timing matters when remodeling a home. Each season holds advantages for different types of projects based on price and availability.  Consider these tips to take advantage of potential savings:

Fall: Pools, kitchens, and appliances
Though pools and summer are tightly linked, waiting until fall for installation can bring worthwhile savings. With the average cost of installing an in-ground pool at $49,224, those savings may be worth the wait.

Kitchen remodeling is among the most popular renovation projects and can be done at any time of the year. Scheduling this project for the fall capitalizes on a slower season for contractors, which can result in lower labor prices. Also, in terms of convenience, tearing apart the kitchen might be easier once children are back in school. While some kitchen renovations can fall in the $10,000 to $15,000 range, expect closer to the average of $22,530.

Fall can also be an ideal time for purchasing new appliances. In preparation for the holiday shopping season, most manufacturers will introduce their new models in the fall, resulting in sales on previous models. 

Winter: Decks, bathrooms, and air conditioning
Ideally, you’ll want a new deck ready to go once the weather warms up but winter is actually the best time to schedule the preliminary planning and design process. This is a dead season for deck contractors and allows your project to be their top priority once the ground softens in the spring. While the cost of building a new deck varies with size, expect anywhere from $2,000 to $7,000.

Competing with the kitchen for the most popular home renovation is the bathroom. Again, indoor work such as this can be completed at any time of the year, but lower rates are more likely during contractors’ slow winters. This should make it easier to schedule the contractor and may lead to a quicker completion. Homeowners tend to spend an average of $10,167 on a new-look bathroom.

While air conditioning is likely the last thought on most consumers’ minds during the winter, this is the time for big savings on both repairs and replacements. Once spring and summer heatwaves kick in, rates will jump back up. The average cost for an A/C repair is $342, while a replacement is $5,465.

Spring: Windows and flooring
Window replacements become common in summer once homeowners start running the A/C, but getting ahead of the curve will help score a deal on installation. Be on the lookout for window companies offering sales to kick off the season and ideally schedule installation once it warms up to over 50 degrees. Prices vary widely based on home size, amount of windows, and type of windows. The average cost for a single-story home with 10 windows is between $3,000 and $7,000.

Late spring is also a great time to pull the trigger on flooring. Early spring can be busy for flooring companies as homeowners begin spending their tax returns, causing tighter scheduling. May is the sweet spot, being right in between this tax-return season and summer’s peak home buying season. Hardwood flooring averages between eight and $10 per square foot with installation while carpeting averages around $3.50 per square foot with installation.

Summer: Paint, landscaping, and furnaces
Demand for almost every renovation project increases during the summer, but there are still deals to be scored. As high school and college students take a break from the classroom, many of them will look towards the popular student painting services for employment. Student-operated painting crews boast substantial savings compared to the labor of professional crews, which should help trim down the $4,000 average cost of an exterior paint job.

Additionally, landscaping and yard work make the most sense to be completed during the summer when the work will be most visible. Though it may be tough to find any deals with the high demand, long summer days allow for more DIY opportunities to cut costs.

Lastly, like air conditioning in the winter, savings can be found on furnace repair and replacement in the summer. Average furnace repair costs are a little less than A/C, coming in at $287, while replacement costs an average of $4,237.

Jackson:  A Prime Location to Build a Life Around What Matters Most
by Mark Olson

Imagine the benefits if we committed to slowing down long enough to identify what matters the most to us in this lifetime.  

While we are all different, there is a high probability that thoughts related to faith, family and friends would rise to the surface.

The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) has surveyed 100,000 people around the globe since 2011 and asked, “What matters most?”  Significant responses in the developed world emphasized health and work / life balance.   

The Full Frame Initiative is a social change organization that also provides perspectives on what matters most.  Two important elements they highlight are social connectedness and meaningful access to relevant resources.  

Those inputs provide the following cross section of what many of us might include on our list of what matters most.

  • Faith
  • Family 
  • Friends
  • Health
  • Work / life balance
  • Social connectedness
  • Meaningful access to relevant resources

When all these factors are considered, I hope there is a dawning awareness that Jackson County, Michigan, provides a prime location for building a life around what matters most.  The combination of qualities we find here in Jackson County are rare and significant:

  • Uncongested- Did you ever consider putting a value on the daily time you save just getting around Jackson versus any major city?
  • Natural beauty- You can drive two miles to the country and find abundant trees, water and farmland.  Did you know that Jackson County sits on one of the largest aquifers in North America and that there are 133 lakes and 200 miles of river waterways inside our county?  These are ideal places to rise above the urgent and focus on the important!  
  • Diverse faith communities-  There are 162 different congregations ministering throughout the county.
  • Low cost of living- According to demographic expert Bert Sperling’s Best Places database, our total cost of living index is 16% lower than the Michigan average and 26% lower than the national average.  Our median home costs are less than 50% of the national average!
  • Growing business community–  In January, Crain’s Communications featured thriving businesses and highlighted Jackson based Commonwealth Associates, Peak Manufacturing Local Logic Media and TransPharm Preclinical Solutions.
  • Assorted recreational opportunities-  Something for everyone! Did you know that Golf Digest ranked Jackson as the fourth-best area to play golf in the nation? 
  • Ample learning opportunities-  To enhance learning at every stage of life our county has a wide range of excellent public and private educational institutions, including two colleges and one university.
  • Innovative community health- We are fortunate to be served by Henry Ford Allegiance Health and it’s continually advancing capabilities.  Did you know that Allegiance Health founded the Health Improvement Organization (HIO) that connects 30 local agencies in championing a culture of health in our community?  These pioneering efforts are receiving national attention. 

Jackson County also excels in the “meaningful access to relevant resources” category:

  • 45 minutes to all the retail, restaurant, academic and athletic options in Ann Arbor and Lansing.
  • 60 minutes to one of the finest airport terminals in the country with nonstop links to major cities and destinations around the world.
  • 1.3 hours to all the urban, cultural, marine and sporting opportunities in Detroit.
  • 1.8 hours to Lake Michigan.
  • 3.3 hours to Chicago, the nation’s 3rdlargest city.

We would be wise to pause in gratitude and recommit ourselves to leveraging these often-overlooked benefits.  Jackson County is a prime location to build a life around what matters most.

How Americans Are Saving For Retirement

 

Recent estimates indicate that the Social Security Trust Fund will run out of its surplus in 2034. Once this occurs, program payouts are expected to be worth only about 77 percent of current benefits. Unfortunately, one-third of retirees rely on social security payments for at least 90 percent of their retirement income. With social security payouts likely headed for significant reduction, contributing to self-directed retirement accounts is more crucial than ever. Just how are Americans doing when it comes to saving for their future?

How America saves
According to a TransAmerica Center survey, the typical American expects to retire at 67 but actually ends up retiring five years earlier than anticipated. A shortened career means less time for earning and saving, as well as more time spent withdrawing from accounts. This further emphasizes how saving for retirement is even more crucial than some Americans might assume.

To understand how America saves for retirement, let's examine savings patterns by various cohorts. The following information is taken from "The State of American Retirement" report by the Economic Policy Institute. 

 

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Name: GuideStream Financial, Inc.
Phone: 800-325-8975
Fax: 517-750-2752
Address: 8050 Spring Arbor Rd., PO Box 580, Spring Arbor, Michigan 49283